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2016 Al-Karak attack - Wikipedia


On 18 December 2016, a series of shootings took place in the city of Al-Karak in southern Jordan . The attack started in the vicinity of Al-Karak where a group of unidentified militants ambushed emergency responders and then moved into the city, attacking police patrols and the local police station and finally seeking shelter in the historic Crusader-era Kerak Castle , a popular tourist attraction.

Severe fog at noon hampered police operations. After an attempt by the Jordanian gendarmerie to besiege the castle, the five attackers were killed following the arrival of the elite Jordanian 71st Special Battalion . Although tourists were present, Jordanian authorities stated that there was no hostage situation; tourists were in a different part of the castle and were unable to leave.

The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack against the " apostate Jordanian security forces". [2] Terror attacks are rare in Jordan, the country is designated as safe and holds 58th out of 130 in the 2016 Global Terrorism Index . [3]

On 18 December 2016, a series of shootings took place in the city of Al-Karak in southern Jordan . The attack started in the vicinity of Al-Karak where a group of unidentified militants ambushed emergency responders and then moved into the city, attacking police patrols and the local police station and finally seeking shelter in the historic Crusader-era Kerak Castle , a popular tourist attraction.

Severe fog at noon hampered police operations. After an attempt by the Jordanian gendarmerie to besiege the castle, the five attackers were killed following the arrival of the elite Jordanian 71st Special Battalion . Although tourists were present, Jordanian authorities stated that there was no hostage situation; tourists were in a different part of the castle and were unable to leave.

The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack against the " apostate Jordanian security forces". [2] Terror attacks are rare in Jordan, the country is designated as safe and holds 58th out of 130 in the 2016 Global Terrorism Index . [3]

AMMAN (Reuters) - Jordanian security forces said they killed four “terrorist outlaws” after flushing them out of a castle in the southern city of Karak where they had holed up after a shoot-out that killed nine people.

An official statement said the four assailants, who shot at police targets in the town before heading to the Crusader-era castle, carried automatic weapons. Large quantities of explosives, weapons and suicide belts were seized in a hideout, the statement said.

It made no mention of their identity or whether they belonged to any militant group, raising speculation they could have been tribal outlaws with a vengeance against the state rather than Islamic State fighters, who control parts of neighboring Syria and Iraq.

Jordanian security forces say they have killed four gunmen after flushing them out of a medieval hilltop castle in the city of Karak.

The gunmen had fled to the castle after a shooting spree that left 10 people dead including a tourist from Canada and at least four police officers.

Earlier, the gunmen had opened fire on two police patrols before fleeing to the castle and attacking a police station there, officials said. Several tourists were trapped in the castle but were freed as security forces moved in.

Security has been enhanced around Windsor Castle ahead of the Changing The Guard ceremony following the Westminster terror attack .

Barriers were put in place around the royal residence in Berkshire on Monday evening to support existing road closures, Thames Valley Police said.

The force said the changes were “proportionate and necessary” but that there was “no specific threat to Windsor” ahead of the next Changing The Guard on Wednesday.

On Monday evening, William S. Castle, the Pentagon’s top lawyer, gave a speech entitled, “Congressional Authorizations on Use of Force?,” at the New York City Bar Association. Mr. Castle is the Defense Department’s Principal Deputy General Counsel performing the duties of the General Counsel. The organizers of the event titled the panel, “The Global War on Terrorism: Do We Need a New AUMF?”

Mr. Castle’s speech outlined the Trump administration’s position in two main areas: (1) the statutory basis for use of military force against al-Qa’ida, the Taliban, and ISIS under the 2001 and 2002 congressional authorizations for use of military force (AUMFs); and (2) the design of any future legislative efforts to explicitly approve force against ISIS or to repeal the existing 2001 and 2002 authorities.

Ryan Goodman Co-Editor-in-Chief of Just Security, Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz Professor of Law at New York University School of Law, former Special Counsel to the General Counsel of the Department of Defense (2015-2016) Follow him on Twitter @rgoodlaw .

On 18 December 2016, a series of shootings took place in the city of Al-Karak in southern Jordan . The attack started in the vicinity of Al-Karak where a group of unidentified militants ambushed emergency responders and then moved into the city, attacking police patrols and the local police station and finally seeking shelter in the historic Crusader-era Kerak Castle , a popular tourist attraction.

Severe fog at noon hampered police operations. After an attempt by the Jordanian gendarmerie to besiege the castle, the five attackers were killed following the arrival of the elite Jordanian 71st Special Battalion . Although tourists were present, Jordanian authorities stated that there was no hostage situation; tourists were in a different part of the castle and were unable to leave.

The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack against the " apostate Jordanian security forces". [2] Terror attacks are rare in Jordan, the country is designated as safe and holds 58th out of 130 in the 2016 Global Terrorism Index . [3]

AMMAN (Reuters) - Jordanian security forces said they killed four “terrorist outlaws” after flushing them out of a castle in the southern city of Karak where they had holed up after a shoot-out that killed nine people.

An official statement said the four assailants, who shot at police targets in the town before heading to the Crusader-era castle, carried automatic weapons. Large quantities of explosives, weapons and suicide belts were seized in a hideout, the statement said.

It made no mention of their identity or whether they belonged to any militant group, raising speculation they could have been tribal outlaws with a vengeance against the state rather than Islamic State fighters, who control parts of neighboring Syria and Iraq.

Jordanian security forces say they have killed four gunmen after flushing them out of a medieval hilltop castle in the city of Karak.

The gunmen had fled to the castle after a shooting spree that left 10 people dead including a tourist from Canada and at least four police officers.

Earlier, the gunmen had opened fire on two police patrols before fleeing to the castle and attacking a police station there, officials said. Several tourists were trapped in the castle but were freed as security forces moved in.

Security has been enhanced around Windsor Castle ahead of the Changing The Guard ceremony following the Westminster terror attack .

Barriers were put in place around the royal residence in Berkshire on Monday evening to support existing road closures, Thames Valley Police said.

The force said the changes were “proportionate and necessary” but that there was “no specific threat to Windsor” ahead of the next Changing The Guard on Wednesday.

On Monday evening, William S. Castle, the Pentagon’s top lawyer, gave a speech entitled, “Congressional Authorizations on Use of Force?,” at the New York City Bar Association. Mr. Castle is the Defense Department’s Principal Deputy General Counsel performing the duties of the General Counsel. The organizers of the event titled the panel, “The Global War on Terrorism: Do We Need a New AUMF?”

Mr. Castle’s speech outlined the Trump administration’s position in two main areas: (1) the statutory basis for use of military force against al-Qa’ida, the Taliban, and ISIS under the 2001 and 2002 congressional authorizations for use of military force (AUMFs); and (2) the design of any future legislative efforts to explicitly approve force against ISIS or to repeal the existing 2001 and 2002 authorities.

Ryan Goodman Co-Editor-in-Chief of Just Security, Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz Professor of Law at New York University School of Law, former Special Counsel to the General Counsel of the Department of Defense (2015-2016) Follow him on Twitter @rgoodlaw .

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On 18 December 2016, a series of shootings took place in the city of Al-Karak in southern Jordan . The attack started in the vicinity of Al-Karak where a group of unidentified militants ambushed emergency responders and then moved into the city, attacking police patrols and the local police station and finally seeking shelter in the historic Crusader-era Kerak Castle , a popular tourist attraction.

Severe fog at noon hampered police operations. After an attempt by the Jordanian gendarmerie to besiege the castle, the five attackers were killed following the arrival of the elite Jordanian 71st Special Battalion . Although tourists were present, Jordanian authorities stated that there was no hostage situation; tourists were in a different part of the castle and were unable to leave.

The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack against the " apostate Jordanian security forces". [2] Terror attacks are rare in Jordan, the country is designated as safe and holds 58th out of 130 in the 2016 Global Terrorism Index . [3]

AMMAN (Reuters) - Jordanian security forces said they killed four “terrorist outlaws” after flushing them out of a castle in the southern city of Karak where they had holed up after a shoot-out that killed nine people.

An official statement said the four assailants, who shot at police targets in the town before heading to the Crusader-era castle, carried automatic weapons. Large quantities of explosives, weapons and suicide belts were seized in a hideout, the statement said.

It made no mention of their identity or whether they belonged to any militant group, raising speculation they could have been tribal outlaws with a vengeance against the state rather than Islamic State fighters, who control parts of neighboring Syria and Iraq.

Jordanian security forces say they have killed four gunmen after flushing them out of a medieval hilltop castle in the city of Karak.

The gunmen had fled to the castle after a shooting spree that left 10 people dead including a tourist from Canada and at least four police officers.

Earlier, the gunmen had opened fire on two police patrols before fleeing to the castle and attacking a police station there, officials said. Several tourists were trapped in the castle but were freed as security forces moved in.

Security has been enhanced around Windsor Castle ahead of the Changing The Guard ceremony following the Westminster terror attack .

Barriers were put in place around the royal residence in Berkshire on Monday evening to support existing road closures, Thames Valley Police said.

The force said the changes were “proportionate and necessary” but that there was “no specific threat to Windsor” ahead of the next Changing The Guard on Wednesday.

On 18 December 2016, a series of shootings took place in the city of Al-Karak in southern Jordan . The attack started in the vicinity of Al-Karak where a group of unidentified militants ambushed emergency responders and then moved into the city, attacking police patrols and the local police station and finally seeking shelter in the historic Crusader-era Kerak Castle , a popular tourist attraction.

Severe fog at noon hampered police operations. After an attempt by the Jordanian gendarmerie to besiege the castle, the five attackers were killed following the arrival of the elite Jordanian 71st Special Battalion . Although tourists were present, Jordanian authorities stated that there was no hostage situation; tourists were in a different part of the castle and were unable to leave.

The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack against the " apostate Jordanian security forces". [2] Terror attacks are rare in Jordan, the country is designated as safe and holds 58th out of 130 in the 2016 Global Terrorism Index . [3]

AMMAN (Reuters) - Jordanian security forces said they killed four “terrorist outlaws” after flushing them out of a castle in the southern city of Karak where they had holed up after a shoot-out that killed nine people.

An official statement said the four assailants, who shot at police targets in the town before heading to the Crusader-era castle, carried automatic weapons. Large quantities of explosives, weapons and suicide belts were seized in a hideout, the statement said.

It made no mention of their identity or whether they belonged to any militant group, raising speculation they could have been tribal outlaws with a vengeance against the state rather than Islamic State fighters, who control parts of neighboring Syria and Iraq.

Jordanian security forces say they have killed four gunmen after flushing them out of a medieval hilltop castle in the city of Karak.

The gunmen had fled to the castle after a shooting spree that left 10 people dead including a tourist from Canada and at least four police officers.

Earlier, the gunmen had opened fire on two police patrols before fleeing to the castle and attacking a police station there, officials said. Several tourists were trapped in the castle but were freed as security forces moved in.

On 18 December 2016, a series of shootings took place in the city of Al-Karak in southern Jordan . The attack started in the vicinity of Al-Karak where a group of unidentified militants ambushed emergency responders and then moved into the city, attacking police patrols and the local police station and finally seeking shelter in the historic Crusader-era Kerak Castle , a popular tourist attraction.

Severe fog at noon hampered police operations. After an attempt by the Jordanian gendarmerie to besiege the castle, the five attackers were killed following the arrival of the elite Jordanian 71st Special Battalion . Although tourists were present, Jordanian authorities stated that there was no hostage situation; tourists were in a different part of the castle and were unable to leave.

The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack against the " apostate Jordanian security forces". [2] Terror attacks are rare in Jordan, the country is designated as safe and holds 58th out of 130 in the 2016 Global Terrorism Index . [3]

AMMAN (Reuters) - Jordanian security forces said they killed four “terrorist outlaws” after flushing them out of a castle in the southern city of Karak where they had holed up after a shoot-out that killed nine people.

An official statement said the four assailants, who shot at police targets in the town before heading to the Crusader-era castle, carried automatic weapons. Large quantities of explosives, weapons and suicide belts were seized in a hideout, the statement said.

It made no mention of their identity or whether they belonged to any militant group, raising speculation they could have been tribal outlaws with a vengeance against the state rather than Islamic State fighters, who control parts of neighboring Syria and Iraq.


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