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Best Answers for the “Why Do You Want to Work Here.


I believe that people are the most stressful part of any job. That sounds harsh. After all, most people are the best part of any job, providing social interaction and supporting skills. But others… well, some are so difficult to deal with that they present an obstacle to you being at your best. Wouldn’t it be so easy just to ignore them? But the truth is that to be successful in your career, you have to be able to work with difficult people effectively. Fortunately, learning how to work well with difficult people is a skill that can be learned.

Here are five common colleagues people complain about. Keep in mind that you will not be able to change them and most likely you won’t even be able to exert a significant influence on their behavior. Approach these situations from the mindset of not ‘how can I change them?’ but with the mindset of ‘how can I change myself in order to work better with them?’

The slacker simply doesn’t like to work . They push their responsibilities on to everyone else around them. They show little initiative and deadlines are merely suggestions to them.

Flickr/Timothy Krause The 40-hour workweek is on its way out, and more Americans are feeling overworked and underpaid. But what if there was an alternative?

To find jobs that allow you to work less but still get paid well, we analyzed US Census data for about 478 occupations distilled by the Minnesota Population Center's 2013 American Community Survey Integrated Public Use Microdata Series .

According to this data, the average working American logs about 39 hours a week, and the  median earned income — a sum of wage, salary, and business income — across all occupations is $32,000.

" Baby What You Want Me to Do " (sometimes called " You Got Me Running " or " You Got Me Runnin' ") is a blues song that was written and recorded by Jimmy Reed in 1959. It was a record chart hit for Reed and, as with several of his songs, it has appeal across popular music genres, with numerous recordings by a variety of musical artists.

"Baby What You Want Me to Do" is a mid-tempo blues shuffle in the key of E [1] that features "Reed's unique, lazy loping style of vocals, guitar and harmonica." [2] In a 1959 review by Billboard magazine, it was called "uninhibited and swampy ... deliver[ed] freely in classic, gutbucket fashion." [3] Music critic Cub Koda describes it as "deceptively simple" and as "one of the true irreducibles [ sic ] of the blues, a song so basic and simple it seems like it's existed forever." [4] However, unlike a typical twelve-bar blues , it includes chord substitutions in bars nine and ten: [1]

Backing Reed are his wife Mary "Mama" Reed on harmony vocal, Eddie Taylor and Lefty Bates on guitars, Marcus Johnson on bass, and Earl Phillips on drums.

I believe that people are the most stressful part of any job. That sounds harsh. After all, most people are the best part of any job, providing social interaction and supporting skills. But others… well, some are so difficult to deal with that they present an obstacle to you being at your best. Wouldn’t it be so easy just to ignore them? But the truth is that to be successful in your career, you have to be able to work with difficult people effectively. Fortunately, learning how to work well with difficult people is a skill that can be learned.

Here are five common colleagues people complain about. Keep in mind that you will not be able to change them and most likely you won’t even be able to exert a significant influence on their behavior. Approach these situations from the mindset of not ‘how can I change them?’ but with the mindset of ‘how can I change myself in order to work better with them?’

The slacker simply doesn’t like to work . They push their responsibilities on to everyone else around them. They show little initiative and deadlines are merely suggestions to them.

I believe that people are the most stressful part of any job. That sounds harsh. After all, most people are the best part of any job, providing social interaction and supporting skills. But others… well, some are so difficult to deal with that they present an obstacle to you being at your best. Wouldn’t it be so easy just to ignore them? But the truth is that to be successful in your career, you have to be able to work with difficult people effectively. Fortunately, learning how to work well with difficult people is a skill that can be learned.

Here are five common colleagues people complain about. Keep in mind that you will not be able to change them and most likely you won’t even be able to exert a significant influence on their behavior. Approach these situations from the mindset of not ‘how can I change them?’ but with the mindset of ‘how can I change myself in order to work better with them?’

The slacker simply doesn’t like to work . They push their responsibilities on to everyone else around them. They show little initiative and deadlines are merely suggestions to them.

Flickr/Timothy Krause The 40-hour workweek is on its way out, and more Americans are feeling overworked and underpaid. But what if there was an alternative?

To find jobs that allow you to work less but still get paid well, we analyzed US Census data for about 478 occupations distilled by the Minnesota Population Center's 2013 American Community Survey Integrated Public Use Microdata Series .

According to this data, the average working American logs about 39 hours a week, and the  median earned income — a sum of wage, salary, and business income — across all occupations is $32,000.

I believe that people are the most stressful part of any job. That sounds harsh. After all, most people are the best part of any job, providing social interaction and supporting skills. But others… well, some are so difficult to deal with that they present an obstacle to you being at your best. Wouldn’t it be so easy just to ignore them? But the truth is that to be successful in your career, you have to be able to work with difficult people effectively. Fortunately, learning how to work well with difficult people is a skill that can be learned.

Here are five common colleagues people complain about. Keep in mind that you will not be able to change them and most likely you won’t even be able to exert a significant influence on their behavior. Approach these situations from the mindset of not ‘how can I change them?’ but with the mindset of ‘how can I change myself in order to work better with them?’

The slacker simply doesn’t like to work . They push their responsibilities on to everyone else around them. They show little initiative and deadlines are merely suggestions to them.

Flickr/Timothy Krause The 40-hour workweek is on its way out, and more Americans are feeling overworked and underpaid. But what if there was an alternative?

To find jobs that allow you to work less but still get paid well, we analyzed US Census data for about 478 occupations distilled by the Minnesota Population Center's 2013 American Community Survey Integrated Public Use Microdata Series .

According to this data, the average working American logs about 39 hours a week, and the  median earned income — a sum of wage, salary, and business income — across all occupations is $32,000.

" Baby What You Want Me to Do " (sometimes called " You Got Me Running " or " You Got Me Runnin' ") is a blues song that was written and recorded by Jimmy Reed in 1959. It was a record chart hit for Reed and, as with several of his songs, it has appeal across popular music genres, with numerous recordings by a variety of musical artists.

"Baby What You Want Me to Do" is a mid-tempo blues shuffle in the key of E [1] that features "Reed's unique, lazy loping style of vocals, guitar and harmonica." [2] In a 1959 review by Billboard magazine, it was called "uninhibited and swampy ... deliver[ed] freely in classic, gutbucket fashion." [3] Music critic Cub Koda describes it as "deceptively simple" and as "one of the true irreducibles [ sic ] of the blues, a song so basic and simple it seems like it's existed forever." [4] However, unlike a typical twelve-bar blues , it includes chord substitutions in bars nine and ten: [1]

Backing Reed are his wife Mary "Mama" Reed on harmony vocal, Eddie Taylor and Lefty Bates on guitars, Marcus Johnson on bass, and Earl Phillips on drums.

Whether on an application form or at interview, the question "why do you want to work here?" is one that you will undoubtedly encounter in any job hunt.

Every employer needs to know that you really want to work for them; a new recruit who is enthusiastic about their company will work harder, be more productive and ultimately stay longer.

While it seems like a fairly innocuous question, "why do you want to work here?" can be difficult to answer really well; it's easy for a reply to be too short or generic.

I believe that people are the most stressful part of any job. That sounds harsh. After all, most people are the best part of any job, providing social interaction and supporting skills. But others… well, some are so difficult to deal with that they present an obstacle to you being at your best. Wouldn’t it be so easy just to ignore them? But the truth is that to be successful in your career, you have to be able to work with difficult people effectively. Fortunately, learning how to work well with difficult people is a skill that can be learned.

Here are five common colleagues people complain about. Keep in mind that you will not be able to change them and most likely you won’t even be able to exert a significant influence on their behavior. Approach these situations from the mindset of not ‘how can I change them?’ but with the mindset of ‘how can I change myself in order to work better with them?’

The slacker simply doesn’t like to work . They push their responsibilities on to everyone else around them. They show little initiative and deadlines are merely suggestions to them.

Flickr/Timothy Krause The 40-hour workweek is on its way out, and more Americans are feeling overworked and underpaid. But what if there was an alternative?

To find jobs that allow you to work less but still get paid well, we analyzed US Census data for about 478 occupations distilled by the Minnesota Population Center's 2013 American Community Survey Integrated Public Use Microdata Series .

According to this data, the average working American logs about 39 hours a week, and the  median earned income — a sum of wage, salary, and business income — across all occupations is $32,000.

" Baby What You Want Me to Do " (sometimes called " You Got Me Running " or " You Got Me Runnin' ") is a blues song that was written and recorded by Jimmy Reed in 1959. It was a record chart hit for Reed and, as with several of his songs, it has appeal across popular music genres, with numerous recordings by a variety of musical artists.

"Baby What You Want Me to Do" is a mid-tempo blues shuffle in the key of E [1] that features "Reed's unique, lazy loping style of vocals, guitar and harmonica." [2] In a 1959 review by Billboard magazine, it was called "uninhibited and swampy ... deliver[ed] freely in classic, gutbucket fashion." [3] Music critic Cub Koda describes it as "deceptively simple" and as "one of the true irreducibles [ sic ] of the blues, a song so basic and simple it seems like it's existed forever." [4] However, unlike a typical twelve-bar blues , it includes chord substitutions in bars nine and ten: [1]

Backing Reed are his wife Mary "Mama" Reed on harmony vocal, Eddie Taylor and Lefty Bates on guitars, Marcus Johnson on bass, and Earl Phillips on drums.

Whether on an application form or at interview, the question "why do you want to work here?" is one that you will undoubtedly encounter in any job hunt.

Every employer needs to know that you really want to work for them; a new recruit who is enthusiastic about their company will work harder, be more productive and ultimately stay longer.

While it seems like a fairly innocuous question, "why do you want to work here?" can be difficult to answer really well; it's easy for a reply to be too short or generic.

H onestly, I don’t know anyone who enjoys this process. Even if you’re comfortable writing about yourself, it’s hard to know where to start or what to leave out. You know yourself better than anyone, but that only seems to make it worse.

Over the past 10 years, I’ve been fortunate enough to help all sorts of people get their websites into shape. I’ve taught workshops on honest marketing and developing portfolios , and I co-wrote a book about writing useful, friendly content. Whenever About pages come up, these are the tips I share:

Think of your About page as a way to introduce yourself. It doesn’t need to be exhaustive, and you don’t have to say anything that makes you uncomfortable. Find a balance between being personal and professional, and try to have some fun. This is a great time to step away from the computer, put your self-critic aside, and do some exploratory writing to take the pressure off.


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